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>> you don't know us investigating reporting. the point we've seen over the years is not just economics. it's was caused administering because it's troublesome. ..'s watch live sunday january 6th at noon eastern on booktv on c-span2. >> coming up booktv presents "after words," an hourlong program where we interview authors. acclaimed inventor ray kurzweil and his latest book, how to create a mind:an exploration of reverse engineering of the brain. the national medal of technology recipient attempts to determine how the brain works and apply the knowledge to the creation of intelligent michelin's. to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind, . to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind,achines . to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind,. to discuss his research with the editor of scientific american mind, ingrid wickelgren. >> this is a fascinating book and it is great to be with you. my first question is to try to talk about the main thesis of the book. are you saying that we can basically reverse engi
is maria pallante and i am united states registrar of copyrights and director of the u.s. copyright office and i would like to say at the outset that for me this is a very wonderful privilege because as you may or may not know because of the long history of copyright law in the library of congress this jefferson building is quite literally the house that copyright bills. let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished . let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished panel that we have. to my left is tom allen, former congressman from maine and chief executive officer of the association of american publishers. to his left his james shapiro, who is a professor of english and a shakespearean scholar and an author and vice president of the author's built, a professor at columbia university. thank you for coming down from new york. did you also come down from new york? from washington. you are everywhere. then we have peter jaszi, professor of copyright law at the washington college of law, american university, also an author. i will say also peter would not want me to, recently gi
a book with steve forbes, "how capitalism will save us: why free people and free markets are the best answer in today's economy" elizabeth ames, first of all, tell us about yourself and your personal experience, particularly when it comes to economics. >> i've been a finance journalist, but i've also been on both sides of the press release. so i started as a journalist and have my own pr business and they've also done projects, communication projects with clients. among them, co-authored the book. basically i were to steve forbes and conversations led to the idea for this book. >> how did you meet steve forbes? >> i met him at an event i did when i was working in southern california and one thing led to another. i moved back to new york. i am from new york and started working at "forbes" of the pr department. >> elizabeth ames, or practical experience, how do that that? >> i've learned a lot since "forbes." when i sat "forbes" islandwide about markets. again, i began as a journalist and worked at "businessweek" many years ago as a journalist. but when i started to work as an entrepren
that their loved by all of the fans here and anthony is joining us, as a football player with a love to have this on the sidelines. >>guest: with the warm seats we sit be greatee my teammates, at this knuckling on these things very again. >>guest: this is the ultimateift and i do think what is it about this as we did talk about this huge comet that they have fun here, the logo, and the team in here they do have, the advisers on the front and these pfizer's to show a reflection of the landscape and whether it be the stadium, and that is significant because it really does show and it really brings the city as a part of the throat and it really does give some relief is he telling you will see on the atlanta falcons, you see the skyline on the top of the city, that is really nice and atlanta falcons, speaking of the skyline, these guys right here, setting the stage in setting themselves up to a run at the big game towards the end of the season. >>guest: i have to make sure you see the back of this because this is the sure the experience, this is the warm cozy wrapped itself around at the fi
were their sort of elements where we agree and hing,f t that will help us understand g in iraq or afghanistan or other conflicts, think if you want a of the viet nam war it is worth the to work like this that will help triet .. .. this is just under an hour. [applause] shalom, good evening, everybody. it's my pleasure to be with uiq. i'm very happy to see so many people coming here and showing an interest in my boat i would like in the next 20 minutes to show we do not want this in the book, but behind the idea. we can all agree with happening in israel is important to the people who live in the united states of america. why? because we share the same values, the same principles, the same heritage and the same enemies. because we are in the middle east today, dean attacked we ask ourselves why these people against the jewish nation in the middle east. not because of the lens we so-called occupied. it is the value we are working upon them in israel and the values of our democracy following very carefully their election he
within the u.s. and the west and libya was a time which i had lived as a junior diplomat from 2004-2006 when a small group of us were sent to tripoli to basically laid the foundation for picking the embassy. i, you know, spend a lot of time in the middle east, sometimes i wonder whether i should a steady japanese like when i was in college because the degree of change ability, it's a drama continuing, but there's a certain something about the region and the people and the disparate culture which is really quite gripping and the more that you get into it the more you become passionate about it. i'm simply very passionate about libya. essentially some of the reflections that i heard, the commentary that was made to me while i was posted in libya were basically driving desire to write this book because a number of people came up to me. very surprising in different contexts, different taxi drivers, police to make lots of money as middlemen between the regime and the private sector, former mark -- former monarchy, people who have been parliamentarians' back in the 60's said, look, we un
, and the 1946 u.s. invasion of mexico." the title, "a wicked war", is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant. from late in his life, grant look back on his career and in his memoir he writes about the experiences that he had, good and the bad. it makes for good reading. one thing that grant spent some time talking about leaving his wife with his role in the us-mexico border of 1986 -- 1846. >> i found is a very moving quote. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow with it. one thing that i talk about in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of the u.s. and mexico war, from being really enthusiastic to largely turning against the war. i think the u.s. and mexico war of the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution, and certainly during the war of 1812. that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of th
of libya's ire -- ire veal -- irrelevance of u.s. policy. go back to the libyan's fate, one, the u.s. relations with lip ya has been, you know, u.s. has always looked at libya as something of a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece, of a strategy that had to do with the region as a whole. it was never looked at -- it was never seen as an object in and of itself. could start with the relation of the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine, and the united states' desire to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid, to get itself together, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil, and the u.s. took a, well, you know, you're not really important as e just a minute, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it, and the result was that the prime minister of the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention, and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drastically th
much for joining us. the question of of whether and how government, particularly the federal government, directs tax dollars to specific industries was a discussion in last night's presidential debate, and can it's become an important and ongoing theme in the current presidential campaign. the terms on which washington assisted the finance and auto industries have also been the focus of intense debate, but probably the most contentious example of all is the one on which diana furchtgott-roth, manhattan institute's senior fellow and our speaker this afternoon, focuses in her timely and important new book "regulating to disaster: how green jobs policies are damaging america's economy." in it she subjects the assumptionings and policies which led to such ill-fated federal investments as that of the now-bankrupt solyndra solar panel manufacturer as well as the a123 battery manufacturer to a withering analysis which we at the institute have come to expect from this oxford-trained economists who served as chief of staff for the council of economic advisers. sorry. during the administration of
better able to be used for teaching purposes and then we hope one day we will end up in law school perhaps with an attorney. thank you for everything you've done. the logic, the framework as follows, the first part of the book deals with the war on terrorism demand utility second power which has a debate. homegrown terrorism which is a debate. in the interrogation issue which is a debate for abrams. and been moved to an area we thought, part two, very big issue. data, technology, and privacy. broca number of debates which include third-party information issues this is a debate. national security of all other issues which is between richardson and couponing. and then we have the einstein. we thought it will be interesting to have a debate about what the new technology is moving forward with his between gen dempsey and paul rosenzweig. and then the communications system law-enforcement act. what's next, susan land out. we are starting with the framework of a week-old legal frameworks for projecting force. we will have to of those debates . to they were going to do cyber warrant atten
delaney will tell us more about it. we are also about chalk card chocolate bar and get card holders year-old received six of these big great last- gifts and parolee $24.95. you putting cash or pop in gift card you will love it as well for number 230-431 coming up for first hour of hsn today. >>host: alright one of my favorites is 0 bakeryfrom auroraerrarabakery let me introduce you to the man himself mr. ernest lumpur and happy holidays to youepore and happy holidays? bria beautiful offers and let me tell you what we are offering today for thevillages these are the different choices there 3 they come in chocolate truffle cake there is the tiramisu and you can get the cheesecake from new york. you can combination or option. you can get the chocolate trouble or tiramisu cake,ruffle art tiramisu cake, tea's or tiramisu cake for cake for the chocolate truffle and cheesecake and tiramisu >>guest: we do not overcook the cake it stays nice and moist once we take them out of the% oven we3 cheesecake stay in refrigerator and we molded it takes 24 hours to make agreed tuesday. this is unbeliev
, the composition of which should obsess us? what is the reason behind this come pullsivity? it is the continuing proclamation that self-government is unnecessary, that one need not apply courage in making decisions, that one need not only spout the party line, but must do it continually. a group of celebrities pledged to obama, and when in the world did we begin in this country pledging allegiance to human beings? [applause] i brought this along because joe kiernan and his daughter wrote this great book. your teacher said what? this is what my child, my 13-year-old brought home from public school. are you a democrat or republican? on gun control, a democrat wants to reticket the number and amount of gun ins, a republican wants to allow citizens to buy guns without restriction. on the environment, a democrat wants to restrict drill, and a republican wants to not pass pollution laws that would cost factories money. if that's not taxation without representation, i don't know what is. [applause] the exhortation of the left are unreasonable and inconsistent insures that no one will adopt them acciden
, but of course it has been put to other uses, too. it's been made in an ironic and a term of endearment so the word nigger as a complicated word and has biomass space, but other aspects as well. .. zenas dress, she was a domestic commercial as a strong-willed lady who raised a slew of kids and sent most of them through college. i knew her for a good portion of my life.dieren she used a whole lot ofhe refert different words. she referred to black people sometimes as colored people, bue she also sometimes used the infamous n-word, and she's been a person whose example and whose wisdom has been all my life to the estimate is it illegal to use the n word? speing, >> well, generally speaking, nou although -- i take that back. if you use the inward in an employment setting for instancer if you are somebody's supervisor and refer to a worker who as a nigger or black people as niggers may be in violation ofhe law creating a hostile workplac and thereby making yourself t subject to liability under thetl 1964e call or under the civil-rights law of 1964. so, under certain circumstancess you can would
offer them the advertisement and ian fleming used to work the mine newspaper what is wrong with it? >> but the state's actually banned advertising. but it offended many writers. but what that has turned into you will find a corporate partners. i worked with to watch because if you take any opportunity then media works with partners with the of liquor they are looking for the market so you will find that type the support so that is really surprised. >> but that is not your. random house will advertise in your books author stage often by the same author. >> but the health care@ often by the same author. >> but the health care system and of their are any other ideas advertising, and museums, . >> the small business in administration would be a delightful federal partner for those who are struggling to stay alive. >> i am feeling that the department of justice case with price fixing over the e-books prices especially from where i set but intellectual property against intellectual property and we're on the wrong purpose where the tax sector uses intellectual property that does not compe
use force it is because we're the united states of america we stand taller and see further. serial huntington said something very profound the west won the world not for security of values or religion but superiority of application of organized violence. westerners forget that the non westerners do not. but to have this policy to iraq have a million children have died and then after 9/11 fed is continue. and greasy the lions running from 8098 from 18980 iraq and afghanistan to the current administration. >> with your book the untold history of the united states. >> but what we are said is not told to the university audience but it is told in the public schools are those who get history from television so that is what we try to challenge. a report card last year but also to look at math and science with high-school seniors show proficiency in u.s. history. that the report said only 2 percent can explain what brown feet board of education was about even though it was implicit our kids don't know much history. what they do know is wrong. it is based on the work of greater science. but
sense that there is a change eric we still reading the way you read of a way that any of us in the audience over the past? >> the one great stories, the sting to places. chance to lot. advertised. changes rapidly. but a work is very popular but also very damaging, complicated. young readers, as you said that will come to him and just did really excited about this aggressively complicated work. >> okay. i think about cognition become especially when you talk about the younger. one of the factors that is important to remember in the digital age which can be very oriented is that when you're learning to read books that are read aloud to less, there is a constant change in the interaction between the reader and the one read too. the one read to is giving a little scam or a little excited. the reader adapts. it's the old story telling. storytelling to an audience, and that is something that the device cannot do. we're learning how to read in need to learn how to understand what is happening, the nuance and the voice that will allow us to go and appreciate the books and taken the
delivering us quality, say that the art machines in machines that are user friendly, machines that will stand the test of time with the amazingll of the innovation and easy to use you are getting the best the best, darlene cahill holt has been hsn for 15 years and she is our sewing expert, an interior designer, she creates her costumes and we love and a dirt court here and you are an author as well. >>guest: hello everyone i hope you are is this site and and this is the last visit of the entire year.13 this is the last show of the last visit. >>host: we will start off with that of sewing machine this is the commercial grade heavy duty sewing machine of what it to see the retail $274.90 and we do have all with a pricing $179 a wave taken $70 off of hsn delivering it to your home for free, but it under the christmas tree, $15 savings, plus you do have 4 flexible payments as the assessed raise that will come included value added assess trees are well over $100 of assessed race accessories. >>host: i just sewed >>guest: throw led, sheer chiffon and 12 layers of denim and that is why this
of dollar that all proof set from the u.s. government go in this as well. new look at this for $1,699 and you get all of thisre kennedy half dollar proof sets and remember the that is $34.50 and $56.50 and $34.95 and $55.50 etc.. they're all valuable also is all the dollars and everything else. there is the constitution dollars of 1987 and 1988 is another olympia and then 1989 is thecongress of white the eisenhower. -- eisenhower. popular sets. you are paying about $100 per set for them.then i will explain about this one in a minute. the only one where the half dollar is also2 silver this1 is the james madison5 commemorative54 and then9 the world cup commemoratives and in '95 the silvo commemorative. and the most valuable of all of these and if you go to www.hsn.com this set is $549 right here. i sell them all the time of that price. i sold them individually out in five minutes last night. $700 basically for those 2 sets. of them at $100 i sell them out in like two seconds. the most popular singles that i have is one right here.all in the original government packaging. around
. are you using somebody else's tablet? or you just always wanted one? >>caller: i have a kobo, and the candle application on my computer. actually --kindle i am trying to convince my grandson he needs one of these and not ipod. thisit cost another hundred dollars and does not do half of this. this is much more substantial. >>guest: certainly a more robust device as well. i do not know how old your grandson is, the material this is made out of its 30 times stiffer than plastic and 20 times harder than plastic making it incredibly durable. >>caller: he is 14.we have college kids that work with us and they say their friends have dropped their ipod time and time again just taking thed. >>host: exactly. cynthia i know you will love it. he is going to wish he told you otherwise. >>caller: his birthday is at the end of january so i am hoping to convince them. >>host: i agree. regardless he would have a ton of fun with it. thank you for stopping by.did you love the flexpay? >>caller: that is the ticket. the flexpay, free shipping accessories. i have never been disappointed in
to win the world needs a novel and what is the sow will the composition that should assess us what is the nature behind the compost devotee that is the proclamation of self-government is unnecessary and one need not apply reason or restraint in making the difficult decisions that one need only spot the party line that one must do it continually. a group of celebrities did a television ad in which they pledge allegiance to obama. this may differ in the degree but not in kind to any fascist salute and when in the world can we begin in this country pledging allegiance to human beings? [applause] i brought this a long because they wrote this great book. this is what my 13 year old child brought home from public school. are you a democrat or republican on gun control and democrat wants to restrict the number and republican wants to allow them to fight citizens without restriction. on the environment a democrat wants to make factories reduce pollution and restrict drilling for oil and park lands and a republican wants to not pass pollution laws delude cost factories money. this is in pub
about 18, and 239 remaining. the susan b. anthony dollars, one of the most ill-fated in the u.s. government. it looks just like 1/4. it was only made 79-81 for three years. it was the last regular issued government issued coin they made the san francisco mint uncirculated condition with the proof. it had all kinds of problems. it makes it a commercial failure but makes it a collectable absolutesaffordable at $129 and a customer pick but $109.95 the most affordablen set released by the u.s. government of all the coin sets we have. the 1999 season the anthony. most people do not even know that coin exists. it was not in the proofset and not man said. that coin you gotta individually--mint- set coin! these, $79 apiece.are $109 across the board for everything that you see. >>host: explain where you get numbers. >>guest: i talked about getting individually and the reason is pretty simple. people buy coins individually to build their sets. when i say if purchased individually that is the way most people put their coins together. the coin catalog they are the lord largest coin c
to be the best of all pleasures to introduce dr. beatrix hoffman to you. she is a leading historian of u.s. health care system. i bet you have been very busy during this political season. with the debate about what is best in health care, what is best in health care insurance, what is best for women's health-care rights, being in the air everywhere we look. as a person addicted to both politics and academic and women's history, i and i'm sure all of us are interested in this presentation so thanks for being here. you couldn't be in a better counter this talky their since much of grand rapids has been very highly invested in the health-care industry, hoping to develop stellar health education, research, innovation in practice, all in the quest for great health-care you. i hope you will be able to see what we call health-care in michigan where so much investment in medical health related work has been made. beatrix hoffman is chair of history at northern illinois. she completed her ph.d. as everyone at my table did at rutgers university in 1996. she has written extensively on the history of
as well. europe and the u.s. until recently liked to think these dark times were in the past and religious violence was somewhere else, in societies more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. our situation calls urgently for critical self examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicions that currently disfigure all western democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketplaces to shops, although the law does not mention the word women, muslim, bertha or bail it was introduced by president nicolas sarkozy and a ban on muslim veiling which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law makes illegal the barca but france is the first country to enact a full ban on the burke that in public space similar restrictions of being considered all over europe and many countries in regions that adopted some type. on april 28, 2011, the chamber of representativ
in french. so i decided to use my time at sea to revise my friend by reading a novel in that language. the book i chose is a small paperback edition of jules burns, all "around the world in 80 days," first published in 1872. when i wasn't on watcher otherwise busy on the ship, i slowly made my way to the book. my french was good enough to my surprise but i enjoyed the story and as a historian i appreciated the period detail. in nature, racing around the world. and his london club, he remarked offhandedly the schedule travel services could take personal around the globe in a period of 80 days. prove it, the clubman challenge him, and he's off. the 80 damage was a conceivable i believe 19th century. in the agency of them getting around the world had taken months or even years. the speed of my citizenship would have lost participant. it was the invention of steam power but also the creation of regimental empires around the globe, the opening of the suez canal and the emergence of commercial travel services that together made it just possible by the 1870s to do the global circuit in 80 da
by fire about general george armstrong custer. our guest is louise barnett. we thank you for joining us. >> guest: thank you area match. >> now, william souder recounts the life of dick darman. she offered an indictment of insecticides including ddt in her book, "silent spring" published in 1962. following the publication, ddt was banned and the environmental protection agency created. this year marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of "silent spring." this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you. thank you overcoming tonight to this wonderful facility. i love coming here. i always remind these guys are so fortunate to work at the national conservation training center. it's a really terrific facility. nice to be back here. nice to see all of you. i guess and the warm-up act for the presidential debate later tonight. i promise no spin and i promise to finish in time so that those of you who can't get enough of politics will be able to go see it, although i don't know who that would be at this point. i'm sure we all want to see the debate, so we will finish on time for
at princeton university, we co-taught a course on ethics and public policy, and that led to us co-authoring several books on deliberation and democracy. >> host: in the spirit of compromise, president, you give two examples, the tax reform and the health care act. if you would, walk us through that. >> guest: so this is a tale of two compromises, and it begins with ronald reagan, presidency, where tax reform was a humanly important issue, and hugely difficult issue to get done between republicans and democrats. those of us who lived through the reagan era recognized people thought they were polarized. tip a stanch liberal democrat, reagan, a republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise with bradley, packwood, be part of the movers of the compromise. farce -- fast forward to the affordable care act, it was arguably for difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party, because of the permanent campaign, and not just polarized, but resistance how the two parties were. the comparison between the tax reform act and the affordable care act helps to see how
insurance companies that incentives to take care of us. >> host: john goodman, when it comes to preexisting conditions, does the government have the rule and saying you need to ensure preexisting conditions? >> guest: yes, but she don't want to join the premium below the cost of care because the insurance company isn't going to want you and is going to treat you poorly. so what we recommend is being able to ensure an advance against preexisting conditions so if you have to pay a higher premium on insurance that pays a higher premium. but also we need affordable insurance. we don't have it dandruff on the care. if you own your own insurance, take a job to job. >> host: the employer system, is it time to not be the system? >> guest: i believe in free markets. employers do what they need to do. but let's have a level playing field. once in every state make it illegal for the employer to buy for employees insurance they can take with them for the next job. we need to abolish laws, turn everything around and encourage affordable insurance. >> host: what is the argument in favor of having it divi
into the ground. >> so could you give some examples, number one, of this network that you talk about in the u.s., how it exists? >> in the u.s., for instance, after the invasion of iraq one of the major construction or reconstruction quote unquote ventures was, you know, commissions, somehow, or given somehow to various corporations that are very much in touch or close to or part of the network of, for instance, vice president dick cheney. whether it's halliburton, other companies, they ended up unfairly taking up these and they didn't do a good job at all by virtue of the result -- [inaudible]. these can networks -- another can of such network, if you would like to look at the much bigger scale, the entire seven to $800 billion bailout is a function of a very quote unquote legal state business network that operates that allows our system to bail out people that have caused the problem under legal pretense. the issue is in countries like syria. the money is much smaller, and the checks and balances that what is the media or the democratic process, and other civil society associations and power
over the fiscal cliff and will take almost every american with us. almost every family that pays taxes now will pay higher taxes. people's jobs will immediately be put in jeopardy, unemployment compensation will end for more than 2 million people, our defenses will be decimated by cuts that will put us in a position of accepting really unacceptable risks to our security, title 1 programs of education for low-income children will be cut dramatically, most people, including the congressional budget office, our own congressional budget office, say that the combination of tax increases along with the decreased spending required under the budget control act will push our economy back into recession in the new year. so i don't agree that no deal is better than a bad deal. in this case, i repeat, no deal is the worst deal because it allows our country to go over the fiscal cliff and really hurts almost every american family in our country, in our economy, as a whole. this shouldn't be a surprise to us. it's not as if, if i could use the metaphor, that congress was going along in a bus and --
of. [laughter] there's similarities between t.s. eliot and me. we both use foreign languages in our poetry. he tends to use more sanskrit. actually don't know much of it. i was a kid who'd got dreamy during sanskrit class in kansas city, missouri. [laughter] to look out the window. i use some yiddish. [laughter] it is fair to say that t.s. eliot was not partial to yiddish. my shortest poem uses yiddish. it was called something like this societal political and philosophical implications of the o.j. simpson trial. the title does not count. the plan was o.j. or a vague [laughter] -o.j. oi vey and then -- we both use a little german when george w. bush appointed a retainer that rhymed roberto gonzales. we both cried about animals and he famously wrote a lot of things about cats. my daughter said once at the dinner table that daddy hates cats. i said daddy does not. that would be prejudice and you girls have been brought up to '04 her prejudice. daddy never met a cat that he liked. [laughter] i have written about the of corgi they look like a breed of dog that has been assembled from the
the problems facing the u.s. economy for about an hour and 45 minutes. next on book tv. [applause] >> thanks to the fashion institute of technology. unquestionably the most in the world today. [applause] in addition to being nobel laureates i would have to say from the vantage point for the economic thinking those would be my finalists. [applause] as you know, we've written a book that pertains to the challenges and circumstance the price of an equality. on behalf of them i thank you for your patronage and. let's start with paul. paul, you talked about and this depression now. a lot of people don't believe we could end this now. but agency deutsch human beings have to take on this challenge? something that is recognizably the same kind of animal. we victimize it is the same technology still there and skills are still there. look back to the 1930's and there are a lot of people making the argument that there were no easy answers and you could quickly get out of this [inaudible] and the 1939 and these are fundamental problems and if we want to make progress to cut unemployment benefits and thi
. [applause] >> thank you, david, everybody for coming. today i would like to engage all of us in a discussion of the question of the book. it's an easy question to state -- i'm sorry easy to answer what should be the role of money in markets in our society? today there are fewer things that money can't buy. if you are sentenced to a jail term and california just in case that happens to anyone of you, you should know that if you don't like the standard accommodations you can buy a prison cell upgrade. it's true. for how much, do you suppose? how much do you think it costs? $5,000? $90 a night. or if you are a tourist suppose you go to washington, d.c. on the congressional hearing that there may be a very long line if it is a popular hearing. and you may not like standing in long lines you can now go to a company called line standing dhaka, and pay them a certain amount of money. they will hire someone usually a homeless person or someone that needs to work to hold the place on line for hours and hours overnight if need be. and when the hearing begins, you can take your place in the line and go
. this is about ten minutes. >> good evening, welcome and thank you for joining us. my name is richard fontaine. i'm the president for the center of new american security. it's a pleasure to welcome you all here to celebrate the publication of robert kaplan's new book the reason geography what they tell us about the coming conflict in the battle against the state. i've heard it said before that you all very great author by reading his books not by buying them -- they will be sold on the stage in this room back here. bald kaplan's work is known no doubt why this audience. he's been a senior fellow and in march of 2008 a foreign correspondent for the atlantic for about a quarter of a century and is currently the chief geopolitical analyst. i first became acquainted with his writing during his book with traces of history of the tight midwesterners living and working in the middle east. and since that book, the very titles of his work goes to the coming anarchy have provoked the debate. the recent book of american power has become acquired reading by those interested in the strategic competition in th
there was a financial crisis coming. were they using a -- how can they know? that's what meltdown is about. i written a lot about u.s. history. the first time c-span covered my the politically incorrect guide to american history. it's one of the book, the title itself. my favorite c-span memory was at at the borns and noble there to do a book signing. my publishers forget to tell me c-span was coming. i get there and the manager of the store says c-span is setting up over there. i said, i'm sorry, what? c-span is -- i had to respondent usely come up with an hour's talk on the spot. it went great. i came to the conclusions i should not script any of my talk. it was a turning point in my life thanks to you guys. >> what is your background? educationally bachelors from hoovered. ph.d. at colombia in u.s. history. i taught. i've been a senior fellow at the institute. and now i run my own educational thing called liberty classroom.com. now that we're living in the information revolution, it's a revolution that makes ambiguitien berg look like a bum. i teach u.s. history to anybody who is interested in lea
's forum is special for those who work at the presidential library and use the and it is a testimony to the hard work and dedication for those employs to work hard to preserve the nation's history and of president kennedy. this secret recordings of jfk which is now on sale sale, would not have been impossible if not for the incredible skills, talent, professional ism, dedication of our library staff in the. government employees. one person in particular rely to a knowledge its which is then archivist of these white house recording as the archivist who knows more about these taped conversations and any of the american. please join us to acknowledge all of our colleagues work here at the kennedy library. [applause] and we have a wonderful panel with us tonight. joining us is presidential historian, ted widmer has selected the most compelling and important recordings then wrote annotations to put them into context. also ellen fitzpatrick professor of history at the university of new hampshire. also frequent contributor to our forum. tom putnam the outstanding director to bring energy to
'll make a couple of suggestions. you might try picturing a burning u.s. warship at pearl harbor. or if you'd rather do a happier image, how about a man kissing a woman, leaning and kissing a woman in times square in new york on the third day. or maybe you prefer politics. how about churchville, stalin and roosevelt a filter sitting down together. maybe that image. or maybe you'd rather think of something from the america of that area roughly, maybe a little bit earlier, the great depression, to get an image in your mind of the great depression. if you're having trouble, think of it tired him a worried looking at another stare off into the distance with a ragamuffin child leaning on each shoulder. can you find that famous iconic image in your mind? that image by dorothea lange called migrant mother that has come to symbolize the great depression. the images you've conjured up in your mind have been black and white. very, very likely. so i'd like you to do the same exercise but think of japanese imprisonments. think of the imprisonment of japanese americans during the war. so what are you pi
, cultural, and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our lewis lemon auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who joins honor heritage.org website on all of these. would ask everyone here in house if you'd be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they are turned off. thank you, louis. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that. we will post the program on a website within 24 hours for your future reference, and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, doctor larry schweikart is a native arizonan turkey on this bachelor and masters degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from university of california, santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a variety of dance. as a rock, he was part of several groups, one of which opened for steppenwolf, among other performers for those old enough
, then the sequestration across-the-board cuts kick back n of course the final word rests right here with us in congress. o.m.b.'s decision with be overridden by a joint resolution. every provision of the calm act o the senate. in fact, at one time or another, nearly every feature of this plan has been offered by both republicans and democrats, including president obama and speaker boehner. all i've done is pull them together to offer them has a compassionate alternative to what happens if we go over the fiscal cliff. true, from the very beginning i have favored a comprehensive solution to put our fiscal house in orderings something along the lines of the simpson-bowles. we don't have that luxury right now. but perhaps it will only soften the blow of the fiscal cliff but also give us a sense of urgency about a grand bargain to repair our financial house. i am not so naive as to believe everybody is going to check their politics at the door, even at this late hour, but this is not a time for politicking, bickering or partisan games. to allow the country to plunge over the fiscal cliff without any alternativ
individual humanity. >> books helped used turn into a writer. do you want to talk for a moment about how you got into writing? >> i began writing, i had speech difficulties as well but my siblings all had speech difficulties. we came up in west virginia. i couldn't speak very well or read very well aloud, so eventually a teacher said, right something. i will throw my books that you or hate you. depending on how far she was. she said i could write something and i really enjoyed that. that was the only thing i was praised for at that age. i enjoyed writing. at 15 i was put back into school and at 16 i joined the army on my 17th birthday. >> you have before you one of the most prolific writers of literature for young people. walter is written over 100 books. he is known throughout the country and the world for his concern about youth which is reflected in most of what we would call young adult fiction which has a focus based on his experience, being born in harlem and being a new jersey boy basically, and this is a career that is remarkable and is one that he is now sharing through his travels
out there i was telling you about flex c13 amount which is using it for great. do not forget you $20 off instantly for plank and approval of your credit carter hsn mastercard. we are going to check in quickly with our hsn spotlight. >>host: welt champion serena williams is returning tomorrow so tune in and check out her signature3 line tomorrow at hsn. to stay with us right now and all of you shoppers we have a great gift for all of those your list that you know what to get 4. it is call this one pencam with the video camera check it out after the commercial. [commercial] [reading] [♪ music ♪] >>host: well, i want to remind everybodykindle fire tablet we are about to cross 10,000 of mark beautiful and amazing tablets soul today. this is a third of our quantity sold today for the entire day and you can take home for under $40 with a credit3 of blacks payments and they do so much for your orders will process your order is as we can. we have lots of new customers to 9 and that's why we a little bit6 c13 the while you are all waiting patiently i want to discuss up fabulous idea.
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inside 8 message or card holder. yet all six of and use seat you get the joint and addition to that you get the happyalso offer peace love in joy and you will receive two of these this grape ready * the year. did the prices $24.95 we have amygp;oldsmith >>guest: how do you get them? you have so many people in your family and friends so we came up with choxcard which you do money and then this park becomes a greeting cards to you all have to buy one and in here we have a all chocolate barbecue this rapper it is delicious and this is a premium on natural chocolate bars that waxy or drugs or brand.this is a kosher bar as well.tore brands. all in one guess is absolutely fun and easy and you look like you put so much thought in nests because sometimes it is hard to give a gift card and people love getting them. u.s. to give cover you sort of feel a sense of personal. >>host: voice feel like it is not substantial enough. >>guest: this makes it extra special and people love to get them. a stocking or boat looks fabulous in can hold its own and it looks just right. the notes great with my
>> host: start by giving us the demographics of the south in 1860. >> guest: that's a crucial question because they went to work on the trade to make donation. they were smaller than the union to start with, roughly 10 million people compared to the indians 22. is already tough road. but a military fact isn't as much paid attention to this it should be as 4 million of those 10 million people were black and enslave. when it came time to mobilize for war, they didn't have access to 10 million people. they have access to avoid population of 16 million, half of women, many underage peers to the demographics are tough to start with. >> host: how many white males at that point in the confederate south? obviously that was the base. >> guest: i try to figure out how many member voting age. the link between voting a soldier and was typed in an 18th century. i figure there's one point at you voting age white men. military age starts out smaller than not. 18 to 35. by the end of the war, 1555. >> host: what advantages going into the civil war, besides caught. we hear about cotton. we've
shifted. these terms are precise or scientific, but it's still useful constructs for thinking about what changed in 1962. environmentalism is different in several important ways. it's a little more pessimistic, not nearly as forward-looking and are much more immediate, urgent and dyer and with the evolution of environmental thinking, we begin to focus more and more on ourselves come over before the species of concern may be a fish or bird or species of some kind or for his spirit must rethink about the environment and our place an icon of the species of concern became honest. what we were doing to the environment and to ourselves in the process. so i think when we look back five decades in the rearview mirror, we can actually see the beginnings of this change in the way we think about the natural world. i call rachel carson a tipping point between these two things. she had a strong presence in the conservation movement and was really an effect founder of the modern environmental movement. i think it's possible to point to a specific movement in time when that happened, when we begin to t
, mobile banking. a whole a ray of services that we can now deliver because we are connected using this frontier technology. and that is such a powerful, powerful thing. it will have legs for the next 20 years, not to mention everything else that my friend talks about in his book on abundance, but it creates so many possibilities. >> who is the it coming prosperity written for? >> well, you know, it's written for the folks watching the show. and it's written for general audience in the united states but globally. i start in the u.s., i and in the u.s.. i feel as though the story is particularly needed in the united states. i don't believe that people in pakistan or china need to hear this because the seat. even in pakistan has really struggled with so much potential. i think it is the next greatest store, the next global opportunity and the resources we wouldn't tell people that because they would be investing heavily and the dividends with other people but it's just on the cusp of happening. really exciting. and so, it's frequent in this country. and it's for anybody that believes
the way it is right now. one general in the book who preferred to go on background and not to use his name said he hoped my book would least help some people understand why we shouldn't go to war so quickly, what it is that is being sacrificed because he compared this general and excuse me, he felt like we were the relevance to fight our wars and there was completely separate reporting on the wars while not having served. it is not a problem because most of what i report on is not groups that i belong to and it's always been that case. writing this book is help may have a greater understanding and not just the difference between a first sergeant and a staff sergeant or sergeant first class. but also just what it's like to be a soldier. by never truly will understand that but i have a much greater understanding of it. i do think that when our nation goes to war, i'm not saying the policymakers, a lot of debate is flippant and there is no resemblance to the reality of these men and women in its one of the reasons i wrote the book. what has happened i have been reporting on stuff for debates.
black, will lead the senate in prayer. the chaplain: let us pray. mighty god, have mercy upon us because of your unfailing love. because of your great compassion, let us feel your presence today on capitol hill. as we gather this weekend with so much work left undone, guide our lawmakers with your wisdom. show them the right thing to do and give them the courage to do it. be their shelter in the midst of the storm, regardless of how high the waters rise. when they feel exhausted, remind them of the great sufficiency of your grace. look with favor on our nation and save us from self-inflicted wounds. we pray in your great name. amen. the presiding officer: please join me in reciting the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c., december 30, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing r
, and if you do want to check in with us and get connected, we'd love to see who is out there watching and shopping. the necklace6 c13 showing you, that is the favorite way to display the penance it is the multi strand necklace. $89.90. it does have a great classic by the way. this is a cylinder cylinder and it does look into it a slender ton and it does slip in and this is your classic and it does not, any pennant that you have will fit onto that and it will create a beautiful backdrop to your attendance. all of your penance will look prettier if you're wondering about this, that is a huge herkimer herkimer necklaces are coming up in my earrings that is the today's special coming up if you are wondering about this these are coming up in just eight little while but if you want 10 stranded from sajen silver are those are still available, use express ordering, we're very busy, you are wondering about the dress that valerie and i are wearing, it is lable, with wine and dine, hundreds out the door and then i had about thousand but we are down to the final 700. and it is stretchy. this is s
to talk about today is my most recent book, "a wicked war: polk, clay, lincoln, and the 1846 u.s. invasion of mexico." the title dream to is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant. from the thinnest i've come across back in everything he did then in his career and this number as he writes frankly about experiences he's had, the good in the bad and it makes for good reading. but one thing that grant spent some time together talking about in his life was his role in the u.s.-mexico war of 1846. grant said at the time, i do not think there is a more wicked words and outraged by the united states and mexico. so at the time when as a youngster, only he had not wrote urging us to resign and grant during the time that the u.s.-mexico war was a young lieutenant. i found this a really moving quotes so he took it from a typo. the fact is grant was not allowed in thinking the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing i talk about in this book and tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of u.s.-mexico war, which is not about word by any means from being really t
falk. all my father left us early. lost or stolen or strayed and my mother raised us and i spent time in an orphanage when i was an infant. my mother raised us on their own my generation was the first generation to go to college. she is a hell of a lot smarter than i am in dishy wanted to get a high-school but there was none to go to at that time. she wanted us to get educated. >>host: when do you being interested in public policy? >> i started to do legal history and michigan. with the draft enacted to the civil war. with all of the materials generated from agencies have the power is exercised how do the powerless get people to listen to them? because when you go to use in antonio texas the first commission held with latinos that i write about nobody answers-- listens to them and kids worse days kicked at a school because spanish as a dirty language. the conditions were awful. or if you read about otis do was and were run over by a car and the commission was sent to him because he was a korean war veteran. they stopped the car and shot him for no reason. later it was because he was b
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